Planning Approved
Enderby Riverside
Inc. London City Cruise Port

Morgan Stanley Real Estate Investing is working with West Properties to deliver a cruise terminal and a 250 room hotel on the riverside at Enderby Wharf. The development also includes commercial space and the restoration of  Enderby House, a grade II listed building built in the 1930s and until recently occupied by Alcatel.   The rest of the site is allocated to residential development. Barratt London, in a 50/50 joint venture with Morgan Stanley, will provide 770 homes of which 154 are Social Housing. For an overview take a look at West Properties website.

 

The site was first developed by the whaling company Enderby & Sons in the 18th century. Subsequently it was used to manufacture some of the first transatlantic telecommunications cables and a cross-channel petrol pipeline to support the D-Day invasion. Alcatel still occupies some of the site although its presence is much diminished.

 

A campaign and a group has come together to press for the conservation and management of Enderby House

 

Plans for the cruise terminal have been mooted for years. A number of locations have been scrutinised but planning permission for this development was granted in 2011, with the cruise terminal promised in time for the Olympics. The developer has promised a new jetty for Thames Clippers to increase transport options. The planning document is available to view on the council website . Application number 13/3025/MA

 

Our knowledge of the Enderby Riverside development, i.e. timescales and architects plans, is limited as representatives have so far failed to attend any construction meetings organised by Hardhat/Barratt although they had previously promised to attend.  However CruiseBritain, who will run the port, publish on their website that the opening is scheduled for early 2016  and that the terminal will serve up to 3,000, passengers at a time and up to 100 ships a year.

 

More information on CruiseBritain and the Greenwich terminal here.

 

 

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